Classic experiments in evidence-based policing

So far, it’s been a fun semester teaching evidence-based policing for the first time. We have covered everything from evidence-based medicine to research design and the Maryland Scientific Methods Scale, and even some basic stats so that we can understand confidence intervals. It’s been particularly rewarding to see students who have spent years in policing exploring and learning about the world of research evidence that supports and helps their world, a world of which many have been until now unaware.

What I am also learning is that those of us in the police education field have done a lousy job of explaining what we do and why it is important to advancing policing and the practice of law enforcement. There is a range of classic studies that are not well known, and an absence of knowledge around these – and other important works – fuels the never-ending cycle of operational decisions that fly in the face of all we know about what works, and what doesn’t. Police still support strategies and crime reduction tactics that are known to not work.

In light of this, I started putting together a list of experiments of which that I thought my students should be aware. The original studies are described in a range of works from academic journal articles to long-winded reports. All pretty impenetrable for most folk, especially busy cops. So I have copied and pasted the key pieces of information into a single page per study, copied from the original sources directly. I cite them at the bottom of each page so you know the source.

This isn’t an exhaustive list, and I intend for it to grow, but for now the list comprises:

  1. The Kansas City Preventive Patrol Experiment
  2. The Newark Foot Patrol Experiment
  3. The Philadelphia Foot Patrol Experiment
  4. The Minneapolis Domestic Violence Experiment
  5. The Minneapolis Hot Spots Policing Experiment
  6. The Philadelphia Policing Tactics Experiment
  7. The Sacramento Hot Spots Policing Experiment
  8. The Queensland Procedural Justice Experiment

I will add to these over time, but for now if you want a copy, download a pdf of the one page summaries.

Note: If you are using these summaries to write a college paper, you should refer to the original study and cite it appropriately. All I have done is edit a copy-and-paste, but I’m 1) not writing a term paper and 2) not passing this off as my own work. If you do, that’s plagiarism.